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Pitching for your film
One of the many areas that rewards persistence and groundwork, filmmaking appeals to masses of creative minds. You might think that you couldn't possibly get into filmmaking because of the costs involved. If you think that, ask yourself, how do blockbusters get produced? Do the actors fund the film? Virtually every time, a writer or an agent will appeal to film companies or investors to secure funding for a movie. They will go down similar to pathways you could take yourself, only on a much bigger scale. So, how do you secure funding for a film? Well, you need to go through stages.

Identifying targets

An easy place to start, you'll need to watch a lot of films or TV. Narrow down your genre to start, or pick a few key points where you're focusing on; try and find your aims. After you've done that, go about searching for films similar to yours. They don't have to be identical, but if they carry similar themes, note down the companies that produced them and their associates. Aside from this, go onto different film associations' or film groups' websites, designed to bring companies and investors together and do some looking yourself. Don't worry about most only taking on ideas from their staff, but there should be a few to contact.

Research

Just going onto a company's website, emailing them and getting an appointment would leave you under prepared. By all means, get a number or an email and send an enquiry off about a meeting, but then you need start doing some groundwork on the company's history. Then look up some of their other productions and take apart their 'about me' paragraphs. What are they looking to produce? How will your film fit in with this?

Putting everything together

If you are close in some capacity to the person or organisation you are appealing to for an investment, that will change what you need to bring to the table. Assuming that you aren't aware of anyone in this position, you'll need to prepare a pitch of some sort. You will not only have to present everything about your idea, but everything about you and your associates, too. After all, they're also investing in your ability to pull the project together. They might ask for a script to read on a later date, so make sure you've got one to hand.

How to come across

You're selling yourself, so be confident and demonstrate the passion that you have in your project. Be completely honest with your aims, but also be up for discussion and receiving advice about ways to go with your idea; you might find that you can come to a compromise. If you don't secure a deal the first time, keep plugging away. Keep in your head that, if you truly believe your film would be worth watching, it will be made.

Author Bio: Richard Towey is an expert consultant of http://centralfilmschool.com/. He is a specialised about filmmaking course and oriented issues.

Click here for more information about Central film school

Event Type: General News
Date: 12/04/2012
Country: United Kingdom
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